« April 2014 »
Sun Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat
30
31
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

 

Username:
Password:





AYP, ACT, TCAP News…


The State of Tennessee recently released district-level 2010-2011 results for Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP), ACT (formerly known as American College Testing), and the Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program (TCAP).

Adequate Yearly Progress

The Knox County Schools made significant progress in AYP in several areas, including:

• Belle Morris Elementary advanced from High Priority status to Good Standing

• Christenberry Elementary advanced from High Priority to Good Standing

• Fulton High School achieved AYP in all categories

• Austin-East Magnet High School achieved AYP in English/reading, which improves their accountability status to “Restructuring I (Improving)” and greatly reduces the risk of Austin-East being taken over and placed in the state’s Achievement School District.

• Middle School mathematics – while 12 out of 14 middle schools did not make AYP in mathematics, there was a 9 percent growth in proficiency in 8th grade math, a 5 percent increase in 7th grade math, and a 3 percent increase in 6th grade math.

Of the 77 schools that qualify to receive AYP results in the Knox County Schools, 16 schools were listed as High Priority (an increase of one over 2010). Of those 16 High Priority schools, 5 made AYP and are now listed as Improving. Two High Priority schools were moved to Good Standing (Belle Morris and Christenberry Elementary Schools).

“After rightfully moving to much higher academic standards in Tennessee, the benchmarks for making AYP are continuing to increase significantly,” said Dr. Jim McIntyre, Superintendent of the Knox County Schools. “We certainly have a good deal more work to do, but we are encouraged by our progress in increasing student academic achievement.”

Under No Child Left Behind (NCLB), schools and school districts are measured on whether the students meet performance benchmarks in math, reading and attendance for grades 3-8 and math, English and graduation rate for high schools. Schools that do not meet the achievement standards for two years are deemed high priority.

AYP status is also calculated each year for the following student subgroups: White, Hispanic, African American, Native American, Asian/Pacific Islander, Economically Disadvantaged, Students with Disabilities and English Language Learners.
NCLB identifies schools that have missed a federal benchmark in the same category for two consecutive years. Tennessee elects to alert schools and districts that are at-risk of becoming a high priority school under NCLB. These schools receive additional support and assistance from the state in order to avoid the NCLB high priority list. Schools that have missed one or more benchmarks for one year are considered target schools.

ACT:
Tennessee’s results from the April 2011 test show the state’s public high school students’ composite ACT score dropped from 19.1 in 2010 to 19.0 out of 36 in 2011, highlighting the ongoing need for education reform to achieve the state’s Race to the Top goal of broader college readiness. Tennessee is one of eight states that require all of its graduates — 68,524 students in 2011 — to take the test.

The Knox County Schools went from a 20.5 in 2010 to a 20.4 in 2011.

“Our goal is to ensure that after students have been with us after 13 years that they have received an outstanding education, as well as acquired the level of knowledge and skills they need to be successful and competitive in their futures,” said Dr. Jim McIntyre, Superintendent of the Knox County Schools.


Tennessee Comprehensive Assessment Program
The Knox County Schools results included overall increases in the percentage of students who scored proficient or advanced in all four subject areas: reading, math, science, and social studies. Specifically, the percentage of Knox County School students who were Proficient or Advanced improved by 1.5 percentage points in reading, 5.8% in mathematics, 2.8% in science and 1.9% in social studies.

Additionally, positive gains in achievement were seen in 18 of the 24 grade level/subject combinations announced by the state.

“Given our new higher academic standards, we are pleased with the progress that we are making, and we are grateful to our teachers, students, parents and staff for all their hard work that has contributed to increased student learning.” said Dr. Jim McIntyre, Superintendent of the Knox County Schools. “We obviously have more work to do to ensure academic success for all students, but this is excellent diagnostic data, and we will use it to determine where our strengths are, and to focus our improvement efforts for the future.”

For more information, please visit tennessee.gov/education.

Contact Webmaster | Site Map | Privacy Policy | View "printer-friendly" page | Login   In Japanese  In Korean  En français  Auf Deutsch  In italiano   No português  En español  In Russian  
Site powered by SchoolFusion.com © 2014 - Educational website content management